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LETTING GO OF PET PEEVES

We all have pet peeves. It's an unfortunate truth, but we do. Maybe you get antsy when your kids come through your freshly-cleaned house like a tornado, or ticked off when your partner doesn't offer to do the dishes, or frustrated when your coworkers show up late to meetings. What might seem annoying to you can be completely harmless to someone else, and vice versa. So, while it's easy to get upset and hold a grudge, it's best to show a little grace, decide what matters most, and forgive the small things. Being irritated is a way of pouring salt on your own roots while turning yourself into someone bound to pour salt on someone else's roots. It clouds our mind with negativity and interferes with our relationships. Just let it go!

IN YOUR MARRIAGE

Don't waste your time and energy arguing about stupid stuff. Everyone has pet peeves, just as everyone has weaknesses. The key is to pick your battles, because being in a good relationship will always feel better than being right. While some things may be worth fighting for or arguing about, most things are not. Be the person who knows the difference. Be the person who can tell what is serious and what is not. Be a person with a long fuse who thinks things through.

The more you feed your pet peeves by becoming upset or irritated, the more strained your relationship becomes. If you want to have a long and healthy marriage, let go of all of your pet peeves. They don't serve you or your marriage well. First identify them, and then set them free. It will be good for both you and your spouse.



WITH YOUR CHILDREN

Kids can be irritating—anyone who has dealt with them knows it. They love to push the boundaries and test our limits. Because of this natural curiosity, it's not hard to pick up a few pet peeves. The challenge with that, however, is that when we're peeved, we're in a constant state of irritation and nothing good comes of it. In fact, we tend to hold onto it all until we finally blow, and that's detrimental to a relationship between a child and parent. If we can practice the art of letting it go to begin with, not letting whatever "it" is bother us, that's the real science behind having great positive relationships. You'll find yourself having a much better time with your kids if you can learn to let go.



IN YOUR WORKPLACE

You sniff a horrible odor and realize a coworker microwaved questionable leftovers for lunch again. Your customer loses their temper and causes a scene. You're trying to concentrate on a deadline and the group behind you is chatting away about their personal lives. No matter how much you love your job, working around situations like these can become a recurring annoyance that can drive you up the wall. In such a setting, it doesn't take long for pet peeves to take control and create a hoard of disgruntled employees. But it doesn't have to. Sometimes, simply asking yourself if a situation is worth getting upset over gives you a change of perspective, helps you separate small things from the big ones, and provides peace of mind. The key for all of us is to learn to accept the fact that we are all imperfect and learn to work together without sweating the small stuff.



SETTING YOUR PET PEEVES FREE

In order to be more heliotropic, we need to get rid of our pet peeves. Don't look for reasons to be irritated, because you'll always find them. Instead, practice the art of letting it go. Even if you love your pet peeves, set them free and you'll find that you and your relationships are left better off because of it.








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